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New Professional Development Class Coming!


Are you a nonprofit executive director in search of a better relationship with your governing board?

Is your relationship with your board collaborative, contentious, or non-existent? Does your board drift between non-management and micromanagement? Do you mentally or emotionally check out of the relationship due to lack of time or commitment?

I'll be leading a new class for Museum Study starting August 3rd on Leading Together: Working for and With Your Board of Trustees. This four-week course is geared for executive directors and will cover roles and responsibilities, assessing the board-staff relationship, and putting strategic and integrative thinking to work at board and committee meetings, among other topics. 

Each week will include readings and assignments. We'll also gather in Zoom chats to explore topics in more depth and problem-solve your CEO-board challenges! 

The cost is $400.

I hope to see you this summer!

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