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Nonprofit Resolutions for the New Year | Infographic

Comments

Unknown said…
Anne-

This is an outstanding graphic!

You can be sure it will be used at the Rock County Historical Society in 15'!

Great book, btw. I'm halfway through!

All the best!

Mike Reuter
Director - RCHS
www.rchs.us
Glad you like the infographic, Mike! The 'resolutions' are kind of no-brainers, but we generally just don't make the time for them despite their importance. Hopefully, the graphic will be a reminder to boards and staffs to carve out some time to tackle the legal and ethical responsibilities we face and enjoy the work we do.

And I'm very happy to hear you're reading Leadership Matters!

Happy New Year,

Anne
Unknown said…
Thanks Anne! Any chance that you have this in higher res so I can print it out and put it in our board room as continued inspiration?

If so, please email to museummike1978@gmail.com

Thanks Anne!

Mike

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